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Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎03-08-2012
My Device: Playbook 32Gig
My Carrier: no provider

$0.99 app vs $1.99 app

Interested in your opinion, what do you think?

Would a $0.99 app receive twice as many purchases as a $1.99 app?

Does it make sense to price in the 1.99-2.99 with all the free android apps coming to playbook?



Thanks,
Tomexx

Developer
Posts: 166
Registered: ‎02-15-2012
My Device: Playbook 16GB
My Carrier: Bags are useful

Re: $0.99 app vs $1.99 app

Hi,

 

Well obviously this depends on your app. Do you think your app is worth that price? In my opinion and probably everyone else's opinion is that 0.99 sounds better and it seems to be an approachable price. If you take into account that there are free android apps coming to app world then you need to consider the competition you will face. I would personally put an app in that scenario for 0.99. That doesn't mean you will get twice as many purchases as you would of if the price had been 1.99.

 

Regards,

Flow

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Developer
Posts: 6,541
Registered: ‎10-27-2010
My Device: HTC One, PlayBook, LE Z10, DE Q10
My Carrier: Verizon

Re: $0.99 app vs $1.99 app

You have to price based on features, value it beings to the client, and competition. If a better app is free, you will have a hard time charging anything. Some people may consider an app that is free as being cheap (not always true), so an app that is being charged for, should be "better". For the most part, the majority of the Android apps are not that great, so a "built for the PlayBook" may have greater value. It all depends on how you market it, and what the preceived value is.

For example, a calculator app that does some really cool things, I would be happy to pay $1-2 for. But a calculator that only does addition, would be crazy to charge anything.
Elite I
Posts: 6,657
Registered: ‎01-14-2009
My Device: BlackBerry Z10
My Carrier: Telus

Re: $0.99 app vs $1.99 app

It will depend on the functionality that your app gives. Usually the biggest barrier to purchasing an app is simply purchasing the app. Once a customer has committed to purchasing the app, the specific price doesn't matter as much, assuming that the app is indeed worth the price.

If your app is going to be very useful and offers something that people actually want, price it at $1.99. If your app offers more limited functionality, and you're almost bordering on whether you should just offer it for free, then I'd go with $0.99.

But that's just my opinion.

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Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎03-08-2012
My Device: Playbook 32Gig
My Carrier: no provider

Re: $0.99 app vs $1.99 app

I guess the app has to be better than the free android one.

 

Another question that comes to mind (I'm new at all this) is:

 

When people say that certain apps have "android look" or "look crappy" vs. "native look for Playbook" what do they mean?

 

Can you point me to a typical android app that's been ported to playbook and has the "android look"?

 

Thanks,

Tomexx

Developer
Posts: 6,473
Registered: ‎12-08-2010
My Device: PlayBook, Z10
My Carrier: none

Re: $0.99 app vs $1.99 app

For what it's worth, and I agree with what's been said so it's not worth much (i.e. it depends a whole lot on the specific app), when I had my $0.99 sale on Battery Guru over Christmas, as soon as it went back up to the regular $1.99 price the sales dropped exactly in half.

I seriously doubt it works this way in most cases. I think it's just a fluke that it happened for mine, but generally I think the price sensitivity would be skewed one way or the other, so that net revenue is higher with one of those two prices.

You also have to consider support costs etc. In my case, it makes more sense to have it at $1.99 and have fewer customers to support, than make the same money at $0.99 and have more customers. At least, that's my theory so far. At $0.99 I'd obviously get more reviews (and if my app didn't already have a whole slew of 5-star reviews I'd probably get better ones at $0.99), and more reviews helps you move up in the App World lists.

If you have it at $0.99 you can't easily have a promotional sale.

If you have it at $1.99 it's harder to raise the price if you add significant features, unless it's truly worth more than that. At $0.99 for a basic initial release, you could bump to $1.99 after an update or two if it's really better, and maybe boost net revenue.

No easy answer. You have to experiment for yourself to find where you should sit.

Peter Hansen -- (BB10 and dev-related blog posts at http://peterhansen.ca.)
Author of White Noise and Battery Guru for BB10 and for PlayBook | Get more from your battery!
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Developer
Posts: 1,452
Registered: ‎11-06-2009
My Device: Torch 9810
My Carrier: WiFi

Re: $0.99 app vs $1.99 app

About an year ago I made a little experiment with one of my smartphone apps. Its price is $2.99. I just cloned it under different name (same description, same icon, same screenshots, same category just different name) and set the clone price to $0.99. In two weeks after the release of the clone, both apps had similar rating and similar placement in their category.

 

Now the funny part: both apps have almost the same number of sales. However the original one is 3 times more expensive than the clone. Go figure.

 

I love theorycrafting Smiley Happy As per my price theory there are certain psychological price levels:

- Free

- $0.99

- $2.99

- $4.99

- $9.99

- Expensive apps (more than $9.99)

 

IMO there should not be actual difference in sales number if your price is in certain price level, for example it shouldn't matter if your app is $1.99 or $2.99. I don't have exact numbers or stats but it seems most paid apps use this price llevel scheme.

 

On the other hand my experiment above contradicts this theory. Smiley Happy

 

 



"When you become a level 3 developer, you learn to communicate over the ether. I'm told that level 5 developers are ascend into a higher level of existence beyond the physical realm." gord888 @ crackberry