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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 220
Registered: ‎11-23-2008
My Device: Storm

Re: Storm, Verizon, and GPS

In BB Maps, click on the little "satellite button" (lower left hand corner), it'll search for a few seconds then put a red dot on your current position.

 

 

 

 

If this has helped, please click on the "Kudos" button.  Thanks! 

Contributor
Posts: 28
Registered: ‎01-03-2009
My Device: Not Specified

Re: Storm, Verizon, and GPS - Sytem Requirements for BB Maps?


mschmehl wrote:
Thank you so much for your help with establishing BB Maps on my Storm.  The link you provided worked great, yet when after I accept the terms, I received a screen which said, "Sorry, your device does not meet the system requirements needed to support BB Maps."...or along those lines.  I receive this same mesaage both before and after loading the new OS.  Help please!

I get the exact same message. Is there a solution?

Contributor
Posts: 28
Registered: ‎01-03-2009
My Device: Not Specified

Re: Storm, Verizon, and GPS - Sytem Requirements for BB Maps?

Nevermind. Discovered it was already loaded on my storm. Duh. Applications, maps. Works great. (and I'm indoors)
Contributor
Posts: 28
Registered: ‎01-03-2009
My Device: Not Specified

Re: Storm, Verizon, and GPS - Sytem Requirements for BB Maps?

BTW, I used the GPS driving to a meeting in Washington earlier this week. Worked just fine. HOWEVER, while I navigated away from the Maps section, I apparently did not first turn off the GPS. Went into an all day meeting with the phone notifications muted. Got in teh car to some back hours later and found my battery was gone. Apparently it had been busily trying to track satelites the whole time i was in the meeting. Advice is to remember to turn off the GPS / satelites!
New Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎03-01-2009
My Device: Not Specified

Re: Storm, Verizon, and GPS

[ Edited ]

Hello, fellow BlackBerryans.  Firefishe here, chiming in for the first time on *these* forums, but not new to the BlackBerry User community at-large.

 

A couple of years ago, I purchased a BlackBerry 8830--the one with the crippled GPS.  I purchased it with the hopes that VZW would unlock it for third-party application use at a later date.

 

When that didn't occur, I ended up cancelling my service with VZW and trading the 8830 for a used 8800 which I used with T-Mobile for a while, before that 8800's power plug broke internally so I couldn't charge it anymore.  I downtraded--both in terms of the network *and* the phone; I knew what I was doing, however, and T-Mobile's customer service is second to none in my opinion.  Now if they only had excellence in coverage and speed that their other GSM counterpart--AT&T--has, we'd have a *Complete Winner* in the cell phone biz.

 

Now, with regard to this thread.

 

The primary CDMA technology provider--read:  *Patent Holder*--is Qualcomm.  Qualcomm pioneered CDMA in the United States and Canada, which I don't think needs any debate.  What I find problematic about CDMA, is that the primary provider still can't make a high-end phone that doesn't have any GPS bugs in it.

 

What's the problem here?  Essentially, integrated GPS-within-the-entire-CDMA-circuit-structure vs. (on GSM devices) a separate GPS chip that works independently and can be accessed via virtually any gps-enabled piece of software.  Also, the lack of a basic GPS/Satellite page, more akin to that of mainline, stand-alone GPS receivers.  More on that later.

 

--

 

I've used the BlackBerry 8800 series with excellent gps results, as well as the BB Curve series, and have found it to have excellent GPS characteristics.  I have to conclude that the GSM BB's, gps-wise, have much more friendlier and customer-friendly interfaces and control areas than their CDMA counterparts.  Here's why:

 

Take two gps-enabled BlackBerry handhelds, one, CDMA, and one, GSM, and set them on a table next to each other.  Go to Settings>Advanced Settings>GPS and compare both pages.

 

What does the GSM have compared to it's CDMA counterpart on that page? A lot, while the CDMA BlackBerry is quite lacking.  GPS-equipped CDMA BlackBerrys have two settings:  '911 Only' or 'Location On' .  The GSM BlackBerry, on the other hand, has a way to turn the GPS off, or select the 'Internal GPS' , which, to me, is much easier to understand and provides the user a more specific indication of what GPS chip is in use.

 

If an external Bluetooth GPS is available, it will also show up here if there is a profile in place for it (corrections, please, if this is an inaccurate statement.)

 

However, the primary difference on the Settings>Advanced Settings>GPS page between a GSM BlackBerry and a CDMA BlackBerry is the presence of actual *Location Information* on the GSM models.  The CDMA models have nothing but a *blank page!*  What's up with that?  Are CDMA technologists so stodgy that the CDMA technical community at-large doesn't want the end user to have that data?  What's a GPS-equipped phone without a location information page?  To me, practically useless.

 

What each should *actually* have, in my opinion, is a standard satellite page like any standard gps receiver--such as a Garmin--might have, with a graphic representation of a globe with satelllite icons with numbers for each satellite and relative-strength bars with the associate satellite number near each.  WAAS indication should also be present.

 

What is so hard with this?  Not one single phone I have seen has this basic GPS page!  I am a hardcore GPS enthusiast, and I can say that the lack of this feature, alone, is hurting the overall feature-base of any GPS equipped pda-style phone with a decent sized screen and high resolution display.

 

Let's face it:  Our BlackBerrys are used as all-in-one devices.  This is their intent, and is the way that wireless communications is progressing.  Soon, it will not be a second thought to have a single device that can perform the duties of Organizer, High Definition Still and Video Camera (10MB and Above), Music Player, and Advanced Multimedia Email Device (Attachment Viewer, Still and Video Email Messages, etc.), but of course <*bow* and handing over the jar of Grey Poupon dijon mustard.)

 

--

 

I have heard people say that "...when you put everything together in one package, every feature takes a cut in quality and usefulness."  I have one thing to say to that:  Horse Feathers!  Nonsense, in other words.  Quality is a measure of how well a design integrates its available features.  Take cameras, for example:  Most new phones come with a meager 2MB camera, or perhaps a 3MB, in the case of the newest BlackBerrys.  Why not put a 10 MB camera in place and be done with it?  Is the cost really that much higher?  Volume discounting is a factor during materials purchasing, anyway, and I can't believe that with the presence of so many good optical providers, that some type of high-quality glass with a 10MB CCD sensor couldn't be had at an equally creative price agreement.  It takes some creativity in procurement, but isn't that what marketing is all about?

 

Creativity needs to take on new meaning, as well,  as we enter the next phase of cell phone evolution, and BlackBerry evolution in general:  The time of the all-in-one, supreme quality, high quantity (do-it-all), communications device!

 

The systems don't have to be complicated or half-hidden as they are now, but should be more open, more transparent, and more controllable by the end-user.

 

Networks should provide for open development for third party developers, and let the developers decide on the quality of their applications and let the end-users decide on the usefulness of a particular piece of software; in short, networks should design the network, and software developers should be free to write software that works transparently with that network, without network political interference. 

 

Circuit designers, like Qualcomm, should adopt a more world-friendly technological stance, combining all available communications technologies for maximum connectivity and customer choice.  They should also keep their departments within their firms connected during the entire phase of a product development cycle and upper management shouldn't stifle creative urges, but should guide them along, and keep personal politics out of the picture so the creative process isn't stifled by idiocy.

 

Strategic partnerships should be established and open communications among design and production personnel, and end-customer testing groups (You and Me doing open Beta testing, in other words) should be the norm, rather than the exception, or even non-existence.

 

Including such a simple thing as a genuinely practical and accurate, fast GPS system with a simple location page as suggested above would be one such step; one as the first of many.

 

Warm Regards,

Firefishe

 

Message Edited by Firefishe on 03-01-2009 03:54 PM
Guru I
Posts: 19,020
Registered: ‎07-29-2008
My Device: Passport, Playbook, 9320BES
My Carrier: Bouygues _ SFR

Re: Storm, Verizon, and GPS


Firefishe wrote:

I have heard people say that "...when you put everything together in one package, every feature takes a cut in quality and usefulness."  I have one thing to say to that:  Horse Feathers!  Nonsense, in other words.  Quality is a measure of how well a design integrates its available features.  Take cameras, for example:  Most new phones come with a meager 2MB camera, or perhaps a 3MB, in the case of the newest BlackBerrys.  Why not put a 10 MB camera in place and be done with it?  Is the cost really that much higher?


I assume you are talking about 10MPix and not 10MB. I think a 10MPix captor is useless. You can take the number one photophone vendor, Sony, the Pix number is quite low. Because the captor is not everything. Optics are also a very important factor, and yu can't do much good using a plastic optics like on most photophones. And when there are exceptions with glass optics (mainly Nokia, Sony and some LG), they have to be protected by a movable cover. And still the quality of optics limit the goodness of a good captor.

 

There are things that are much more important that number of pixels : optical zoom, fast shutter speed (seriously, 3s after clicking ?), autofocus (I know the Storm is one of the very few Photophones to have that), color balance... you can live with a 3MPix camera, provided the rest is okay.

 

That bein said, all vendors know that. They are prepared. But they don't need to release models that have all that good features. Because their concurrents don't.

Take the touchscreen : they all had it, but didn't want to release it too soon because it would have eaten their other models.

 

 

 


Firefishe wrote:

The systems don't have to be complicated or half-hidden as they are now, but should be more open, more transparent, and more controllable by the end-user.

 

Networks should provide for open development for third party developers, and let the developers decide on the quality of their applications and let the end-users decide on the usefulness of a particular piece of software; in short, networks should design the network, and software developers should be free to write software that works transparently with that network, without network political interference. 


as a consumer I agree with all the rest of your message, but I don't really see why all vendors should do that unless they are challenged by another vendor. Business is not about creativity of giving features to the consumer, it's about getting as much money from these milk cows !




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Highlighted
New Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎03-01-2009
My Device: Not Specified

Re: Storm, Verizon, and GPS [Long Reply]

[ Edited ]
Replies Follow ">>>" in Original Body, Below:

Xandrex wrote:

Firefishe wrote:

I have heard people say that "...when you put everything together in one package, every feature takes a cut in quality and usefulness."  I have one thing to say to that:  Horse Feathers!  Nonsense, in other words.  Quality is a measure of how well a design integrates its available features.  Take cameras, for example:  Most new phones come with a meager 2MB camera, or perhaps a 3MB, in the case of the newest BlackBerrys.  Why not put a 10 MB camera in place and be done with it?  Is the cost really that much higher?


I assume you are talking about 10MPix and not 10MB. I think a 10MPix captor is useless. You can take the number one photophone vendor, Sony, the Pix number is quite low. Because the captor is not everything. Optics are also a very important factor, and yu can't do much good using a plastic optics like on most photophones. And when there are exceptions with glass optics (mainly Nokia, Sony and some LG), they have to be protected by a movable cover. And still the quality of optics limit the goodness of a good captor.

 

>>> What do you mean by the term 'captor?'  CCD? (Charge Coupled Device); in short, the electronic 'film' that is light-sensitive in a digital camera.

 

>>> Yes, I meant Ten Megapixel (10Mpix); my mistake on that one, thanks for pointing it out. :-)

 

>>> Carl Zeiss has some good optics for digicams; good glass makes up for poor CCD's, too, in my honest opinion, so I agree with you there.

 

There are things that are much more important that number of pixels : optical zoom, fast shutter speed (seriously, 3s after clicking ?), autofocus (I know the Storm is one of the very few Photophones to have that), color balance... you can live with a 3MPix camera, provided the rest is okay.

 

>>> I've got a great Pentax Optio S5i that is 5Mpix and takes great shots.  Granted, it's a stand-alone digicam, but it works wonderfully.  Autofocus is pretty fast, too.  If this type of camera were put in a BlackBerry, but a bit faster with your suggestions as mentioned, above, we'd have a real multimedia BlackBerry video powerhouse on our collective plates! :-)))

 

That bein said, all vendors know that. They are prepared. But they don't need to release models that have all that good features. Because their concurrents don't.

Take the touchscreen : they all had it, but didn't want to release it too soon because it would have eaten their other models.

 

>>> Just because a manufacturer's current products don't have a particular feature set, doesn't mean that they shouldn't release something with a great set of features the end-user will go ga-ga over--provided that they're practical and they work properly.

 

>>> As to a touch screen, I would like to see a touch screen on a unit like the 9000 Bold or the 8900 Javelin.  I would also like to see standardized CDMA/GSM (with 1700 'T-Mobile 3G' MHz included) combination units as the rule, rather than the exception.  Additionally, I don't think a touch-screen is going to win-over a lot of BlackBerry users at this point.  The Storm is a good handheld, but the touch-screen experience isn't an iPhone; and I mean for just basic interfacing, not necessarily the thumb-typing element.  Just how one navigates menus can set a touch-screen handheld up for praise or chagrin.  The Storm, for me, at this time, is a bit in the middle between the two.

 

 


Firefishe wrote:

The systems don't have to be complicated or half-hidden as they are now, but should be more open, more transparent, and more controllable by the end-user.

 

Networks should provide for open development for third party developers, and let the developers decide on the quality of their applications and let the end-users decide on the usefulness of a particular piece of software; in short, networks should design the network, and software developers should be free to write software that works transparently with that network, without network political interference. 


as a consumer I agree with all the rest of your message, but I don't really see why all vendors should do that unless they are challenged by another vendor. Business is not about creativity of giving features to the consumer, it's about getting as much money from these milk cows !

 

>>> I disagree with you on most of this response.  Why?  Because, to me, it's 'not all about the money.'  Yes, monetary gain from a handheld *is* the end-goal, but my point is that without third party software development, the usefulness of a handheld like the BlackBerry is limited.  Luckily, most vendors--even CDMA vendors like Sprint, Alltel, and US Cellular (in the U.S.)--don't limit the development of Java Applications on the BlackBerry.

 

>>> Using them as a primary example, Verizon Wireless is the only CDMA vendor that has imposed limits on third-party software development.  They're also the largest, which is why my hackles get raised when the largest company in a narrowly-defined market stifles this kind of progress; they infest the majority of their market with limited-foresight thinking (which includes Profit) that affects all end-users in the most negative way imaginable:  By forcing the end-user to realize their handheld is *LIMITED*, which has the end-result of the end-user--Read: CONSUMER!--provided with the mental image of their cellular network being limited.

 

>>> In the world I inhabit, 'thought-equals-form,' through the normal idea-realizing-and-implementing process.  One can see how limiting a product that would otherwise not be limited--except by cell network provider choice--negates most of any type of positive feedback the company originally desired.  That's how I see it, anyway, and how I would handle the correction of the problem, that is, the 'angle' from which I would see the problem as it is, and, from there, how to correct it, and correct it quickly!

 

>>> Creativity *IS* the cornerstone of handheld development, for both now and Future Development!  Why?  Because when software developers create software which enhances the function of a handheld and satisfies a particular user base, that company has succeeded in providing the handheld manufacturer another market for their product.  This *enhances* the ability of a handheld to provide more value-per-dollar market share, and sells more product.

 

>>> Summarizing, when cellular network providers don't interfere with third party developers, many great programs with equally great feature sets provide an extra market base that, in turn, brings in new customers, sometimes from areas that they didn't think about before; without third party developers, a handheld like the BlackBerry--and a company as large as Verizon Wireless--are missing many opportunities for growth, and that doesn't sit well with customers who want more.  The Online BlackBerry Forums that abound on the 'net are rife with these kind of complaints, and especially for this particular vendor.
>>> When cellular networks insist on controlling third-party software developers to the point of stifling all but those with the deepest pockets, many fine, low cost, highly respectable programs don't get to market in the largest CDMA segment of the United States Cellular market; CDMA is king, here, and gets into the most real estate, especially in the rural markets, which, combined, round-out the last third of the large-city markets to form a cohesive whole.  VZW is seriously limiting its own growth, and I can't believe that will sit well with their investors in the long run.  If I had stock, I'd seriously consider voting the board out of office and implementing a younger, more progressive group, instead of the 'old codgers' still stuck back in the 'A-B Analog' daZe. (Yes, 'daZe').
>>> We need to have more freedom with our applications and the software to choose for our handhelds.  We need to have network-to-software transparency, with regard to on-board hardware, like GPS.  This is for the best, all-around experience for cellular networks, handheld manufacturers, and end-users, alike.  The cellular market is like a lake; it has an environment, which can thrive, or be stagnant.  It just depends on how well each segment--network provider, handheld manufacturer, and end-user--choose to manage the environment, relative to their own interfacing with the environment.  History has shown that the two former, larger segments of the environment, tend to take the environment's 'natural resources' more for granted than the latter.
>>> Individuals tend to look more closely at the world around them, while the larger entities have, historically, tended to want to strip-mine the market-world for everything it could get in the least amount of time.  Time is now showing that path to be the way to a lot of unnecessary legal issues that clog up the market machine that could be operating at peak-level, instead of 'Model T Fording' along at a turn-of-the-century snail's pace.
>>> I leave it up to you to decide.
Warm Regards,
Firefishe
 
Message Edited by Firefishe on 03-05-2009 12:59 AM
New Contributor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎07-27-2010
My Device: BlackBerry Storm 9530
My Carrier: Verizon

Re: Storm, Verizon, and GPS

If you are still there, I lost my VZ Navigator in a hard reboot with Verizon's help. Now cannot find it anywhere, with or with out their help. How can I download again?

Guru I
Posts: 19,020
Registered: ‎07-29-2008
My Device: Passport, Playbook, 9320BES
My Carrier: Bouygues _ SFR

Re: Storm, Verizon, and GPS [Long Reply]


Firefishe wrote:

 

I've got a great Pentax Optio S5i that is 5Mpix and takes great shots.  Granted, it's a stand-alone digicam, but it works wonderfully.  Autofocus is pretty fast, too.  If this type of camera were put in a BlackBerry, but a bit faster with your suggestions as mentioned, above, we'd have a real multimedia BlackBerry video powerhouse on our collective plates! :-)))

 

that is true, but :

remember that most photophones use a plastic lens. You will never be able to take a better picture with than than with a very low budget camera that has a glass lens. Sony finally understood that, and for some models Samsung too. But those are the exceptions in 2010.

 

 

 


Firefishe wrote:

Just because a manufacturer's current products don't have a particular feature set, doesn't mean that they shouldn't release something with a great set of features the end-user will go ga-ga over--provided that they're practical and they work properly.

 

As to a touch screen, I would like to see a touch screen on a unit like the 9000 Bold or the 8900 Javelin.  I would also like to see standardized CDMA/GSM (with 1700 'T-Mobile 3G' MHz included) combination units as the rule, rather than the exception.  Additionally, I don't think a touch-screen is going to win-over a lot of BlackBerry users at this point.  The Storm is a good handheld, but the touch-screen experience isn't an iPhone; and I mean for just basic interfacing, not necessarily the thumb-typing element.  Just how one navigates menus can set a touch-screen handheld up for praise or chagrin.  The Storm, for me, at this time, is a bit in the middle between the two.

 

well, shouldn't or anything, it's just personal opinion, proof is that they release a feature because it's wanted by the public, or because the public thinks they want it. To get more money !!!!! Smiley Very Happy

 

About your opinion on the Storm/Storm2, indeed it was a middleman device, before the true touchscreen experience by RIM appears. This experience is called the BlackBerry Torch 9800 and indeed, the touchscreen is quite different. There is no SurePress anymore.

 

About the fact that the first touchscreen devices from RIM delivered a so-so experience compared to the iPhone, it is mainly because RIM did not want to dramatically change the OS. It is a touchscreen, but with the OS of a trackball/trackpad device. Hence the clicking. With the new OS, labeled "Blackberry 6", things are quite different from what I have seen on the blogosphere.

 

 

About the network connectivity, my opinion is that designing CDMA devices is an aberration. This CDMA technology is a local technology that only works in 3 countries in the world : US & Canada (okay I am exaggerating a bit, but just a bit). GSM/3G is marvelous, in the entire world except in some parts of the US (New York for example, because AT&T did not want to spend the money on adding more cellular antennas).

But CDMA has to pertain in the US and Canada for a very stupid reason : for mobile devices, one of the best brand of processors is Qualcomm, and Qualcomm is on CDMA. And RIM has a lot of intrications with Qualcomm.

 

 


Firefishe wrote:

>>> Creativity *IS* the cornerstone of handheld development, for both now and Future Development!  Why?  Because when software developers create software which enhances the function of a handheld and satisfies a particular user base, that company has succeeded in providing the handheld manufacturer another market for their product.  This *enhances* the ability of a handheld to provide more value-per-dollar market share, and sells more product.

  

Let's face it : the iPhone has not had much cretive features from it's first version to today's iPhone 4 :

  1. first version <-- ok there is creativity here !
  2. iTunes synchronization <-- just capitalizing on existing iTunes for iPod
  3. more speed,
  4. more memory,
  5. more speed,
  6. smaller,
  7. AppStore available <-- catching up with Windows Mobile &  BlackBerry & Symbian
  8. 3G,
  9. more speed,
  10. Exchange connectivity <-- catching up with Windows Mobile &  BlackBerry & Symbian
  11. OpenGL <-- it's not creativity, but close thanks to apps
  12. Compass
  13. more speed
  14. 3G+
  15. smaller,
  16. copy/paste finally available <-- catch up
  17. another gyroscope <-- allows more creativity for games, mimicking the Nintendo & Nintendo DS
  18. limited multi tasking <-- partial catch up

as you can see, not much creativity here.

 

Let's look on BlackBerry side :

  1. 8830 : World phone : both GSM & CDMA.
  2. 8100 : got the small keyboard. no creativity here, that keyboard existed 3 years before
  3. 8330 : slower CPU, but with a camera <-- catching up with non-smartphones LG/Samsung/Sony/Motorola
  4. 8320 : Wi-Fi ! catching up with competition
  5. 8330 : GPS <-- catching up with competitors too
  6. 9000 : bigger keyboard. faster. Great backside. <--- ok a little creativity on form factor
  7. 8230 : Pearl Flip : first clamshell. catching up with Korean competitors and Motorola's Razr.
  8. 8900 : nothing new...
  9. Storm/Storm2 : first touchscreen. catching up.
  10. Storm/Storm2 : SurePress touchscreen keyboard. that is creativity. Was not so good except for previous BlackBerry owners. Won some annual tech awards though.
  11. more speed
  12. more space
  13. more battery
  14. Touch : first slider. catching up.
  15. Pearl3G : nothing new... faster, better, no revolution.
  16. and then the new OS BlackBerry 6 : no widgets on home screen, replaced by fixed enhancements.

 

as you can see, not much creativity here either.

 

 




The search box on top-right of this page is your true friend, and the public Knowledge Base too:
Guru I
Posts: 19,020
Registered: ‎07-29-2008
My Device: Passport, Playbook, 9320BES
My Carrier: Bouygues _ SFR

Re: Storm, Verizon, and GPS [Long Reply]

 


Firefishe wrote:

As to a touch screen, I would like to see a touch screen on a unit like the 9000 Bold or the 8900 Javelin.


The Torch 9800 has just been released. Basically it is a Bold 9700, that slides, with a solid touchscreen (not clickable), and with the new OS. And a camera wtth more pixels.

 

 

 

 

 


Firefishe wrote:

Using them as a primary example, Verizon Wireless is the only CDMA vendor that has imposed limits on third-party software development.  They're also the largest, which is why my hackles get raised when the largest company in a narrowly-defined market stifles this kind of progress; they infest the majority of their market with limited-foresight thinking (which includes Profit) that affects all end-users in the most negative way imaginable:  By forcing the end-user to realize their handheld is *LIMITED*, which has the end-result of the end-user--Read: CONSUMER!--provided with the mental image of their cellular network being limited.

  

Let's face it. The most successful stories in terms of popularity and money gains in software IT were made by companies that enforced the most restrictions (in terms of usage or APIs) :

  1. Sun Solaris Unix  & HP-Unix, facing Linux
  2. Apple AppStore facing all other mobile phone platforms
  3. Apple iTunes facing all other digital music providers including Amazon
  4. BlackBerry BES facing Microsoft ActiveSync
  5. Microsoft Exchange & Lotus Domino facing IMAP
  6. Skype facing all other VoIP protocols
  7. Microsoft Office facing all other Office suites
  8. Valve Steam facing all other gaming platforms
  9. Adobe Flash streaming videos facing all other streaming video protocols
  10. Opera Mini facing all other browsers for Mobile platforms

 

Of course there are some exceptions, like Google Maps or YouTube or Facebook. But that's just for the exceptions. Between a company and the users, sometimes what is best for the users is not best for the company and ends up not being the best for the users. well, nearly all the time.

That hurts to say all that, because I am an open-source evangelist.

 

 


Firefishe wrote:
>>> Summarizing, when cellular network providers don't interfere with third party developers, many great programs with equally great feature sets provide an extra market base that, in turn, brings in new customers, sometimes from areas that they didn't think about before; without third party developers, a handheld like the BlackBerry--and a company as large as Verizon Wireless--are missing many opportunities for growth, and that doesn't sit well with customers who want more. 

 

 

I agree with you! But it takes time for those ideas to reach the top of the pyramid. Fortunately, RIM has started really focusing on developers :

  • AppWorld (where other app shops were already available and successful on BlackBerry platform).
  • a BlackBerry developer blog
  • several dev conferences every year
  • a more "developer-friendly" OS with BlackBerry 6
  • some enhanced dev tools

 

besides, RIM has started working very hard on what they call the addon applications : WML, ICQ, Facebook... look at the recent Twitter client app, and let's not forget the future diamond that will emerge from acquiring Viigo.

 




The search box on top-right of this page is your true friend, and the public Knowledge Base too: