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BlackBerry® World™ Development

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Developer
Posts: 1,452
Registered: ‎11-06-2009
My Device: Torch 9810
My Carrier: WiFi

Re: Is it against the rules

What's next? The one who posts negative posts on the forums or blogs get banned from App World (and because it is the only way to distribute apps, the one just disappears)

 

Just saying  

 

Read the BB Dev success stories and fill yourself with more optimism  



"When you become a level 3 developer, you learn to communicate over the ether. I'm told that level 5 developers are ascend into a higher level of existence beyond the physical realm." gord888 @ crackberry
Developer
Posts: 455
Registered: ‎03-04-2011
My Device: Paper cup

Re: Is it against the rules


QuiteSimple wrote:

What's next? The one who posts negative posts on the forums or blogs get banned from App World (and because it is the only way to distribute apps, the one just disappears)



Well, in that case there's this great invention called the PC where no-one can ban you from publishing for it.

 

Developer
Posts: 6,541
Registered: ‎10-27-2010
My Device: HTC One, PlayBook, LE Z10, DE Q10
My Carrier: Verizon

Re: Is it against the rules

Yes, the software you write, you do own. You own the copyright and intellectual property of how it was written. But the software you sale, you (the author) still own. The person who purchased the software from you does not own it, they have a license to use it. They are limited in what they can do with it, so it is not like buying a book. A book you can resale. Software, you cannot (for example). If you look at any EULA, you will see that you have very little writes in how you can distribute and copy the software. App World is similar in that fashion. RIM owns the hardware, owns the operating system and owns how software is distributed, installed, managed and purchased. If anyone does like the terms of that ("fair" or "unfair"), they do not have to use the platform and ecosystem to distribute their product.

Now, it is in RIMs best interest to have a platform and ecosystem that is the best on the market, or developers (and then consumers) will fall back to other tablets and phones that offer a "better" platform and ecosystem.
Developer
Posts: 425
Registered: ‎03-17-2011
My Device: Developer
My Carrier: Telus

Re: Is it against the rules


silver20 wrote:
I own my own software. And I've often written custom programs for friends and family.

It's censorship. Only books sanctioned by the Company can be in your house. Violates freedom of publication.

What next? You can only visit sanctioned websites -- to try and prevent viruses?


You claim of censorship is silly. You have the unrestricted right to distribute your app however you like. RIM provides tools to sign the apps and to load the apps onto your device (or any other PlayBook). You could even offer your apps for sale on the interwebs if that is what you desire. Your store would probably not be particulaqrly successful, but who says that RIM should be in the business of supporting your enterprise at the expense of their own shareholders? RIM is a public company and needs to maximize their profit in order to survive. If they don't want to facilitate the existence of 3rd party distribution, it is within their right to deny OTA capability.

 

This is the reqason that RIM does not provide a facility for OTA installations on BB10 devices. This is not censorship - it is good business!

 

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Developer
Posts: 304
Registered: ‎08-01-2008
My Device: Not Specified

Re: Is it against the rules


MauriceRice wrote:
If they don't want to facilitate the existence of 3rd party distribution, it is within their right to deny OTA capability.
This is the reqason that RIM does not provide a facility for OTA installations on BB10 devices. This is not censorship - it is good business!

Right, it is good business just like it is good business when :

 

1. Carriers refuse to unlock your phones.

 

2. Microsoft bundles Internet Explorer to kill other browsers.

 

3. Apple forces you to give them 30% of your revenue by whatever means you earn.

 

and so on...

Highlighted
Developer
Posts: 6,541
Registered: ‎10-27-2010
My Device: HTC One, PlayBook, LE Z10, DE Q10
My Carrier: Verizon

Re: Is it against the rules

[ Edited ]

But that *is* good business when you are in a less competitive environment or trying to protect your market position. If it is legal, then it is good business. Is it "fair"? Probably not. But business is not suppose to be "fair", it suppose to provide a return on your investment and to leverage your position to the maximum amount possible.

 

What makes business seem "fair" is competition. If a carrier sees that it can attract more customers by unlocking your phone, it would. If Microsoft did not feel threatened by other browsers in the race to have the best on-line experience and capture services surrounding browsers, it would bundle multiple browsers. If Apple felt that other device began taking some of their market share and developers were moving to other platforms, it would reduce their revenue percentage.

 

Is it "fair" or "good business" to charge customers to bring a bag on an airplace?  Not fair, but you also have no choice.  And airlines like Southwest use that practice to their advantage by letting everyone know that they do not charge for a bag, and that, inturn creates more and loyal clients.  

 

Business is a fluid medium.  A practice today will change with time based on customers needs, competition, economic pressures, regulations and periodic sales cycles.